This item still needs to be validated !
ITEM METADATA RECORD
Title: Associated malformations and chromosomal anomalies in 42 cases of prenatally diagnosed diaphragmatic hernia
Authors: Witters, Ingrid ×
Legius, Eric
Moerman, Philippe
Deprest, Jan
Van Schoubroeck, Dominique
Timmerman, Dirk
Van Assche, Frans Andre
Fryns, Jean-Pierre #
Issue Date: Nov-2001
Publisher: Wiley-Liss
Series Title: American Journal of Medical Genetics vol:103 issue:4 pages:278-282
Abstract: We present a retrospective study of the frequency and type of associated malformations and chromosomal anomalies in 42 consecutive cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) diagnosed in utero during the period from 1985 to 1999. In 26% (11/42) of the cases, associated malformations were detected. Chromosomal anomalies were present in 9.5% (4/42). In this group of 15 cases (15/42 = 36%) with associated malformations or chromosomal anomalies, all cases, except one, had prenatal sonographic evidence of additional problems. The survival rate of fetuses with CDH and associated malformations or chromosomal anomalies was poor (1/15). Therefore, the overall survival rate of in utero-diagnosed CDH was only 31% (13/42), while isolated left CDH had a survival rate of 52% (12/23). The in utero diagnosis of CDH implies a detailed echographic examination to exclude additional anomalies. The risk for a syndromal or chromosomal malformation becomes small when no additional anomalies are seen on ultrasound.
URI: 
ISSN: 0148-7299
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Section Woman - Miscellaneous (-)
Clinical Genetics Section (-)
Translational Cell & Tissue Research
Basic Research in Gynaecology Section (-)
Clinical Genetics
Faculty of Medicine - miscellaneous
Department of Human Genetics - miscellaneous
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.

Request a copy

 




All items in Lirias are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

© Web of science