Title: Influence of dissolved gases on sonochemistry and sonoluminescence in a flow reactor
Authors: Gielen, Bjorn ×
Marchal, Sander
Jordens, Jeroen
Thomassen, Leen
Braeken, Leen
Van Gerven, Tom #
Issue Date: 2-Feb-2016
Publisher: Butterworth Heinemann
Series Title: Ultrasonics Sonochemistry vol:31 pages:463-472
Abstract: In the present work, the influence of gas addition is investigated on both sonoluminescence (SL) and radical formation at 47 and 248 kHz. The frequencies chosen in this study generate two distinct bubble types, allowing to generalize the conclusions for other ultrasonic reactors. In this case, 47 kHz provides transient bubbles, while stable ones dominate at 248 kHz. For both bubble types, the hydroxyl radical and SL yield under gas addition followed the sequence: Ar > Air > N2 >> CO2. A comprehensive interpretation is given for these results, based on a combination of thermal gas properties, chemical reactions occurring within the cavitation bubble, and the amount of bubbles. Furthermore, in the cases where argon, air and nitrogen were bubbled, a reasonable correlation existed between the OH-radical yield and the SL signal, being most pronounced under stable cavitation at 248 kHz. Presuming that SL and OH• originate from different bubble populations, the results indicate that both populations respond similarly to a change in acoustic power and dissolved gas. Consequently, in the presence of non-volatile pollutants that do not quench SL, sonoluminescence can be used as an online tool to qualitatively monitor radical formation.
ISSN: 1350-4177
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Process Engineering for Sustainable Systems Section
UC Limburg - miscellaneous
Sustainable Chemical Process Technology TC, Technology Campus Diepenbeek
Sustainable Chemical Process Technology TC
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

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