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Title: In vitro stress exposure as a tool for the optimization of cryopreservation for Solanum spp.
Other Titles: In vitro blootstelling aan stress als een instrument voor de optimalisatie van de cryopreservatie van Solanum spp.
Authors: Folgado, Raquel
Issue Date: 30-Jun-2014
Abstract: Production and consumption of potato has expanded from the Andean region, where it was initially domesticated, to Europe, North America first and Africa and Asia later. In the centre of origin eight species of cultivated landraces are found as well as more than two hundred wild potato relatives, yet all commercial varieties belong to the species, S. tuberosum subsp. tuberosum.The broad genetic diversity in cultivated and wild potatoes is an important source of genetic material in breeding. These genetic resources are currently conserved as tubers or as in vitro plants. However, cryopreservation, the storage of biological material in liquid nitrogen (LN), is considered the best method for the long-term conservation of vegetatively propagated plants. As all biochemical processes are blocked, the biological material can be stored for an indefinite period at low cost and with limited space requirements.However for potato (and other species) cryopreservation techniques need considerable improvement before they can be used on a routine basis for the establishment of safely stored collections. The key for a successful protocol lies in the avoidance of intracellular ice formation. It is known that the application of an appropriate preculture of donor plantlets (low temperatures, osmotic stress) before cryopreservation is useful to attain this objective. Such preculture conditions are, in fact, stress treatments and therefore the study of the response of plants to these constraints may provide additional clues to develop better cryopreservation procedures, thereby facilitating the conservation of the rich genetic resources found in nature.The study of stress responses in potato is important because this crop is considered to be drought-sensitive. Moreover, cold is known to be the major environmental constraint that affects potato yield. The huge diversity in potato shows variation in sensitivity to drought and cold. Commercial potato varieties are very sensitive to drought and cold stress. In contrast, some landraces and wild potatoes respond better to stress conditions like water-deficit and low temperatures. During such stress treatments, the metabolism of donor plants or explants changes and these changes can be monitored by biochemicalanalyses. In this study, we focused on the response to abiotic stress conditions (drought, cold) and identified and quantified changes in the accumulation of proteins and soluble sugars that may provide clues about which metabolites change under different preculture conditions. These metabolic changes were related with the ability of different varieties to respond to different pretreatments for cryopreservation. Finally, this resulted in the improvement of a cryopreservation protocol in potato.<span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal"><span style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal">
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: TH
Appears in Collections:Division of Crop Biotechnics

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