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Title: Cementing the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty: which technique is the best?
Authors: Vanlommel, Jan
Luyckx, Jean-Philippe
Labey, Luc
Innocenti, Bernardo
De Corte, Ronny
Bellemans, Johan #
Issue Date: Jun-2010
Publisher: Springer International
Host Document: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy vol:18 issue:Suppl 1 pages:S304-S304
Conference: 14th ESSKA congress edition:14 location:Oslo, Norway date:9-12 June 2010
Article number: Poster 19-1036
Abstract: Objectives: Aseptic loosening of the tibial component remains a major
cause of failure in total knee arthroplasty and may be related, directly or
indirectly, to micromotion. Therefore, good fixation of the tibial component
is a prerequisite to achieve long-term success of the implant.
Cementing technique is one of the factors that play a role in this respect.
We investigated the effect of different cementing techniques on the
cement penetration in the proximal tibia.
Methods: We compared 5 different cementing techniques in an anatomical
open pore sawbone model (n=25), using a contemporary TKA
design and standard polymethylmetacrylate cement. In the first technique,
10 g of cement was applied in a thin layer on the lower surface of
the tibial component. The component was then placed and impacted onto
the tibia using the specific component impactor supplied by the manufacturer.
In the second technique, 20 g of cement was applied in a thick
layer on the lower surface of the tibial component. In the third technique,
20 g of cement was applied in equal parts, on both the tibial
component and the tibial bone using a spatula. In the fourth technique,
20 g of cement was applied in equal parts on both the tibial component
and the tibial bone, but it was fingerpacked into the bone. In the fifth
technique, 20g of cement was applied to the tibial bone with the use of a
cement gun.
After making cuts in the medial and lateral oblique sagittal plane of the
tibia, we used Corel PHOTO-PAINT 9 to quantify the cement
penetration.
Results: Technique 1 (thin layer of cement on the tibial implant only)
and 2 (thick layer of cement on the tibial implant only) were not significantly
different from each other in terms of penetration depth, but
were both significantly different from the other techniques. The same
was seen for technique 3 (two equal parts of cement on both the tibial
component and the tibial bone using a spatula) and 4 (two equal parts of
cement on both the tibial component and the tibial bone, using the
fingerpacking technique). The penetration depth was highest for technique
5 (using a cement gun), which was significantly different from all
the other techniques.
Conclusions: We demonstrated that applying cement to both the undersurface
of the tibial baseplate and as well as onto the tibial bone, either by
a spatula or fingerpacking technique, leads to an optimal cement penetration
of 3-5mm. When cement is applied only onto the tibial component,
penetration is insufficient. When a cement gun is used, cement penetration
is too excessive.
URI: 
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IC
Appears in Collections:Non-KU Leuven Association publications
# (joint) last author

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