Title: C9orf72 G4C2 repeat expansions in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment
Authors: Cacace, Rita ×
Van Cauwenberghe, Caroline
Bettens, Karolien
Gijselinck, Ilse
van der Zee, Julie
Engelborghs, Sebastiaan
Vandenbulcke, Mathieu
Van Dongen, Jasper
Bäumer, Veerle
Dillen, Lubina
Mattheijssens, Maria
Peeters, Karin
Cruts, Marc
Vandenberghe, Rik
De Deyn, Peter P
Van Broeckhoven, Christine
Sleegers, Kristel #
Issue Date: Jun-2013
Publisher: Elsevier
Series Title: Neurobiology of Aging vol:34 issue:6 pages:1712.e1-7
Article number: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2012.12.019
Abstract: C9orf72 GC repeat expansion is a major cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Its role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is less clear. We assessed the prevalence of GC pathogenic repeat expansions in Flanders-Belgian patients with clinical AD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In addition, we studied the effect of non-pathogenic GC repeat length variability on susceptibility to AD, and on AD cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker levels. A pathogenic repeat expansion was identified in 5 of 1217 AD patients (frequency <1%). No pathogenic expansions were observed in patients with MCI (n = 200) or control individuals (n = 1119). Nonpathogenic repeat length variability was not associated with AD, risk of conversion to AD in MCI individuals, or CSF biomarker levels. We conclude that pathogenic C9orf72 GC repeat expansions can be detected in clinical AD patients and could act as a contributor to AD pathogenesis. Non-pathogenic repeat length variability did not affect risk of AD or MCI, nor AD biomarker levels in CSF, indicating that C9orf72 is not a direct AD risk factor.
ISSN: 0197-4580
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Research Group Psychiatry
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.

Request a copy


All items in Lirias are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

© Web of science