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Title: Diagnosis and treatment of lupus nephritis flares--an update
Authors: Sprangers, Ben ×
Monahan, Marianne
Appel, Gerald B #
Issue Date: Dec-2012
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Series Title: Nature Reviews. Nephrology vol:8 issue:12 pages:709-717
Article number: 10.1038/nrneph.2012.220
Abstract: Relapses or flares of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are frequent and observed in 27-66% of patients. SLE flares are defined as an increase in disease activity, in general, requiring alternative treatment or intensification of therapy. A renal flare is indicated by an increase in proteinuria and/or serum creatinine concentration, abnormal urine sediment or a reduction in creatinine clearance rate as a result of active disease. The morbidity associated with renal flares is derived from both the kidney damage due to lupus nephritis and treatment-related toxic effects. Current induction treatment protocols achieve remission in the majority of patients with lupus nephritis; however, few studies focus on treatment interventions for renal flares in these patients. The available data, however, suggest that remission can be induced again in a substantial percentage of patients experiencing a lupus nephritis flare. Lupus nephritis flares are independently associated with an increased risk of deterioration in renal function; prevention of renal flares might, therefore, also decrease long-term morbidity and mortality. Appropriate immunosuppressive maintenance therapy might lead to a decrease in the occurrence of renal and extrarenal flares in patients with SLE, and monitoring for the early detection and treatment of renal flares could improve their outcomes.
URI: 
ISSN: 1759-5061
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Laboratory of Experimental Transplantation
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

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