ITEM METADATA RECORD
Title: Thymidine analogues to assess microperfusion in human tumors
Authors: Janssen, Hilde ×
Ljungkvist, Anna S
Rijken, Paul F
Sprong, Debbie
Bussink, Jan
van der Kogel, Albert J
Haustermans, Karin
Begg, Adrian C #
Issue Date: Jul-2005
Series Title: International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics vol:62 issue:4 pages:1169-1175
Abstract: PURPOSE: To validate the use of the thymidine analogues as local perfusion markers in human tumors (no labeling indicates no perfusion) by comparison with the well-characterized perfusion marker Hoechst 33342. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Human tumor xenografts from gliomas and head-and-neck cancers were injected with iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) and the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342. In frozen sections, each blood vessel was scored for the presence of IdUrd/BrdUrd labeling and Hoechst in surrounding cells. The percentage of analogue-negative vessels was compared with the fraction of Hoechst-negative vessels. Collocalization of the two markers was also scored. RESULTS: We found considerable intertumor variation in the fraction of perfused vessels, measured by analogue labeling, both in the human tumor xenografts and in a series of tumor biopsies from head-and-neck cancer patients. There was a significant correlation between the Hoechst-negative and IdUrd/BrdUrd-negative vessels in the xenografts (r = 85, p = 0.0004), despite some mismatches on a per-vessel basis. CONCLUSIONS: Thymidine analogues can be successfully used to rank tumors according to their fraction of perfused vessels. Whether this fraction correlates with the extent of acute hypoxia needs further confirmation.
URI: 
ISSN: 0360-3016
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.

Request a copy

 




All items in Lirias are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

© Web of science