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Title: Biochemical characteristics of Trametes multicolor pyranose oxidase and Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase and implications for their functionality in wheat flour dough
Authors: Decamps, Karolien ×
Joye, Iris
Haltrich, Dietmar
Nicolas, Jacques
Courtin, Christophe
Delcour, Jan #
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: Applied Science Publishers
Series Title: Food Chemistry vol:131 issue:4 pages:1485-1492
Abstract: Similar to glucose oxidase (GO), pyranose oxidase (P2O) may well have desired functionalities in some food applications in general, particularly breadmaking. As its name implies, P2O oxidises a variety of monosaccharides. P2O purified from a culture of Trametes multicolor (P2O-Tm) had high affinity towards D-glucose (KM = 3.1 mM) and lower affinity to other monosaccharides. GO from Aspergillus niger (GO-An) had a KM value of 225 mM towards glucose, which points to a significant difference in glucose affinity between the two enzymes. Furthermore, P2O-Tm had higher affinity towards O2 (KM = 0.46 mM) than GO-An (KM = 2.9 mM). Dehydroascorbic acid did not accept electrons in the reactions catalysed by P2O-Tm and GO-An. For the same activity towards glucose in saturating conditions, the rate of ferulic acid oxidation
in a model system and of thiol oxidation in a wheat flour extract were higher with P2O-Tm, than with GO-An. The demonstrated differences in properties and functional features between P2O-Tm and GO-An allow prediction of differences in functional behaviour of the enzymes, in food applications.
ISSN: 0308-8146
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Centre for Food and Microbial Technology
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

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