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Title: Shortening amplitude affects the incomplete force recovery after active shortening in mouse soleus muscle
Authors: Van Noten, Pieter ×
Van Leemputte, Marc #
Issue Date: Dec-2009
Publisher: Pergamon Press
Series Title: Journal of Biomechanics vol:42 issue:16 pages:2636-2641
Abstract: Compared to isometric contraction, the force producing capacity of muscle is reduced (force depression, FD) after a work producing shortening phase. It has been suggested that FD results from an inhibition of cross-bridge binding. Because the rate constants of the exponential force (re)development are thought to be primarily determined by cross-bridge attachment/detachment rate, we aimed to investigate the components of force redevelopment (REDEV) after 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4mm shortening, resulting in varying amounts of FD (from about 5% to about 16%), in mouse soleus muscle (n=11). Compared to isometric force development (DEV), the time to reach steady-state during REDEV was about 3 times longer (370 versus 1261ms) increasing with increasing amplitude. Contrary to a single, a double exponential function with one component set equal to the rate constant of DEV (14.3s(-1)), accurately described REDEV (RMS<0.8%). The rate constant of the additional slow component decreased with increasing shortening amplitude and was associated with work delivered during shortening (R(2)=0.75) and FD (R(2)=0.77). We concluded that a work related slow exponential component is induced to the trajectory of incomplete force recovery after shortening, causing FD. These results suggest that after shortening, aside from cross-bridges with normal attachment/detachment rate, cross-bridges with reduced cycling rate are active.
URI: 
ISSN: 0021-9290
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Exercise Physiology Research Group
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

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