ITEM METADATA RECORD
Title: Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in 9357 Subjects From 11 Populations Highlights Missed Opportunities for Cardiovascular Prevention in Women
Authors: Boggia, José ×
Thijs, Lutgarde
Hansen, Tine W
Kikuya, Masahiro
Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina
Richart, Tom
Ohkubo, Takayoshi
Jeppesen, Jørgen
Torp-Pedersen, Christian
Dolan, Eamon
Kuznetsova, Tatiana
Olszanecka, Agnieszka
Tikhonoff, Valérie
Malyutina, Sofia
Casiglia, Edoardo
Nikitin, Yuri
Lind, Lars
Maestre, Gladys
Sandoya, Edgardo
Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina
Imai, Yutaka
Wang, Jiguang
Ibsen, Hans
O'Brien, Eoin
Staessen, Jan A
on behalf of the International Database on Ambulatory blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes (IDACO) Investigators #
Issue Date: Mar-2011
Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Series Title: Hypertension vol:57 issue:3 pages:397-405
Abstract: To analyze sex-specific relative and absolute risks associated with blood pressure (BP), we performed conventional and 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements in 9357 subjects (mean age, 52.8 years; 47% women) recruited from 11 populations. We computed standardized multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for associations between outcome and systolic BP. During a course of 11.2 years (median), 1245 participants died, 472 of cardiovascular causes. The number of fatal combined with nonfatal events was 1080, 525, and 458 for cardiovascular and cardiac events and for stroke, respectively. In women and men alike, systolic BP predicted outcome, irrespective of the type of BP measurement. Women compared with men were at lower risk (hazard ratios for death and all cardiovascular events=0.66 and 0.62, respectively; P<0.001). However, the relation of all cardiovascular events with 24-hour BP (P=0.020) and the relations of total mortality (P=0.023) and all cardiovascular (P=0.0013), cerebrovascular (P=0.045), and cardiac (P=0.034) events with nighttime BP were steeper in women than in men. Consequently, per a 1-SD decrease, the proportion of potentially preventable events was higher in women than in men for all cardiovascular events (35.9% vs 24.2%) in relation to 24-hour systolic BP (1-SD, 13.4 mm Hg) and for all-cause mortality (23.1% vs 12.3%) and cardiovascular (35.1% vs 19.4%), cerebrovascular (38.3% vs 25.9%), and cardiac (31.0% vs 16.0%) events in relation to systolic nighttime BP (1-SD, 14.1 mm Hg). In conclusion, although absolute risks associated with systolic BP were lower in women than men, our results reveal a vast and largely unused potential for cardiovascular prevention by BP-lowering treatment in women.
ISSN: 0194-911X
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Hypertension and Cardiovascular Epidemiology
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

Files in This Item:
File Description Status SizeFormat
11-06-P.pdf Published 427KbAdobe PDFView/Open

 


All items in Lirias are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

© Web of science