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Title: Cross-national prevalence and correlates of adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
Authors: Fayyad, J ×
De Graaf, R
Kessler, R
Alonso, J
Angermeyer, M
Demyttenaere, Koen
De Girolamo, G
Haro, J M
Karam, E G
Lara, C
Lépine, J-P
Ormel, J
Posada-Villa, J
Zaslavsky, A M
Jin, R #
Issue Date: May-2007
Publisher: Royal Medico-Psychological Association
Series Title: British Journal of Psychiatry vol:190 pages:402-9
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Little is known about the epidemiology of adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). AIMS: To estimate the prevalence and correlates of DSM-IV adult ADHD in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Survey Initiative. METHOD: An ADHD screen was administered to respondents aged 18-44 years in ten countries in the Americas, Europe and the Middle East (n=11422). Masked clinical reappraisal interviews were administered to 154 US respondents to calibrate the screen. Multiple imputation was used to estimate prevalence and correlates based on the assumption of cross-national calibration comparability. RESULTS: Estimates of ADHD prevalence averaged 3.4% (range 1.2-7.3%), with lower prevalence in lower-income countries (1.9%) compared with higher-income countries (4.2%). Adult ADHD often co-occurs with other DSM-IV disorders and is associated with considerable role disability. Few cases are treated for ADHD, but in many cases treatment is given for comorbid disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Adult ADHD should be considered more seriously in future epidemiological and clinical studies than is currently the case.
URI: 
ISSN: 0007-1250
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Research Group Psychiatry
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

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