ITEM METADATA RECORD
Title: Prognostic value of reading-to-reading blood pressure variability over 24 hours in 8938 subjects from 11 populations
Authors: Hansen, Tine W
Thijs, Lutgarde
Li, Y
Boggia, José
Kikuya, Masahiro
Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina
Richart, Tom
Ohkubo, Takayoshi
Jeppesen, Jørgen
Torp-Pedersen, Christian
Dolan, Eamon
Kuznetsova, Tatiana
Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna
Tikhonoff, Valérie
Malyutina, Sofia
Casiglia, Edoardo
Nikitin, Yuri
Lind, Lars
Sandoya, Edgardo
Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina
Imai, Yutaka
Wang, Jiguang
Ibsen, Hans
O'Brien, Eoin
Staessen, Jan A # ×
Issue Date: Apr-2010
Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Series Title: Hypertension vol:55 issue:4 pages:1049-1057
Abstract: In previous studies, of which several were underpowered, the relation between cardiovascular outcome and blood pressure (BP) variability was inconsistent. We followed health outcomes in 8938 subjects (mean age: 53.0 years; 46.8% women) randomly recruited from 11 populations. At baseline, we assessed BP variability from the SD and average real variability in 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings. We computed standardized hazard ratios (HRs) while stratifying by cohort and adjusting for 24-hour BP and other risk factors. Over 11.3 years (median), 1242 deaths (487 cardiovascular) occurred, and 1049, 577, 421, and 457 participants experienced a fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular, cardiac, or coronary event or a stroke. Higher diastolic average real variability in 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings predicted (P<or=0.03) total (HR: 1.14) and cardiovascular (HR: 1.21) mortality and all types of fatal combined with nonfatal end points (HR: >or=1.07) with the exception of cardiac and coronary events (HR: <or=1.02; P>or=0.58). Higher systolic average real variability in 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings predicted (P<0.05) total (HR: 1.11) and cardiovascular (HR: 1.16) mortality and all fatal combined with nonfatal end points (HR: >or=1.07), with the exception of cardiac and coronary events (HR: <or=1.03; P>or=0.54). SD predicted only total and cardiovascular mortality. While accounting for the 24-hour BP level, average real variability in 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings added <1% to the prediction of a cardiovascular event. Sensitivity analyses considering ethnicity, sex, age, previous cardiovascular disease, antihypertensive treatment, number of BP readings per recording, or the night:day BP ratio were confirmatory. In conclusion, in a large population cohort, which provided sufficient statistical power, BP variability assessed from 24-hour ambulatory recordings did not contribute much to risk stratification over and beyond 24-hour BP.
URI: 
ISSN: 0194-911X
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Hypertension and Cardiovascular Epidemiology
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

Files in This Item:
File Description Status SizeFormat
10-10-P.pdf Published 1011KbAdobe PDFView/Open

 


All items in Lirias are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

© Web of science