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Title: An in vivo study of the influence of the surface roughness of implants on the microbiology of supra- and subgingival plaque
Authors: Quirynen, Marc ×
van der Mei, H C
Bollen, C M
Schotte, Anne-Marie
Marechal, M
Doornbusch, G I
Naert, Ignace
Busscher, H J
van Steenberghe, Daniel #
Issue Date: Sep-1993
Series Title: Journal of Dental Research vol:72 issue:9 pages:1304-9
Abstract: In nine patients with fixed prostheses supported by endosseous titanium implants, 2 titanium abutments (transmucosal part of the implant) were replaced by either an unused standard abutment or a roughened titanium abutment. After 3 months of habitual oral hygiene, plaque samples were taken for differential phase-contrast microscopy, DNA probe analysis, and culturing. Supragingivally, rough abutments harbored significantly fewer coccoid micro-organisms (64 vs. 81%), which is indicative of a more mature plaque. Subgingivally, the observations depended on the sampling procedure. For plaque collected with paper points, only minor qualitative and quantitative differences between both substrata could be registered. However, when the microbiota adhering to the abutment were considered, rough surfaces harbored 25 times more bacteria, with a slightly lower density of coccoid organisms. The presence and density of periodontal pathogens subgingivally were, however, more related to the patient's dental status than to the surface characteristics of the abutments. These results justify the search for optimal surface smoothness for all intra-oral and intra-sulcular hard surfaces for reduction of bacterial colonization and of periodontal pathogens.
ISSN: 0022-0345
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Periodontology
Prosthetics
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

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