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Title: Predictability of reformatted computed tomography for pre-operative planning of endosseous implants
Authors: Jacobs, Reinhilde ×
Adriansens, Annelies
Naert, Ignace
Quirynen, Marc
Hermans, Robert
van Steenberghe, Daniel #
Issue Date: Jan-1999
Series Title: Dento maxillo facial radiology vol:28 issue:1 pages:37-41
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To determine the reliability of reformatted 2D-CT for pre-operative planning of implant placement. METHODS: One hundred consecutive partially or fully edentate patients underwent 2-D reformatted CT pre-operative planning and subsequent implant placement. The number, site and size of the implants, the available bone height and anatomical complications were recorded. The pre-operative planning and the outcome at surgery were compared statistically using a percentage agreement and Kendall's correlation coefficient. RESULTS: Agreement between the pre- and intra-operative data was good for the number of implants (60%) and the selected sites (70%). From a total of 416 implants planned, 21 implants could not be placed because of intra-operative findings. Agreement was relatively poor for implant size (44%) and anatomical complications (46%). Kendall's correlation coefficient was highest for the number of implants (0.80) and implant sites (0.81). It was much lower for implant sizes (0.51) and did not reach significance for anatomical complications (0.09). CONCLUSIONS: Reformatted 2D-CT is reliable for the pre-operative assessment of the number and sites of implants in the jaws. It is less predictable for the implant size needed and poor for anatomical complications.
URI: 
ISSN: 0250-832X
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Periodontology
Oral Imaging
Prosthetics
Radiology
Clinical Residents Dentistry
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

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