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Title: Morphology Development of Immiscible Polymer Blends in Extensional Flows Developed within a Microfluidic Device
Authors: Mulligan, M.K.
Clasen, Christian
Rothstein, J.P. #
Issue Date: Aug-2008
Publisher: American Institute of Physics
Host Document: American Institute of Physics Conference Proceedings vol:1207 issue:Part 2 pages:979-981
Conference: The XVth International Congress on Rheology and The Society of Rheology 80th Annual Meeting edition:15 location:Monterey, CA (USA) date:3-8 August 2008
Abstract: A microfluidic device was used to create precisely controlled drops of deionized water in
polydimethylsiloxane oil and then study the morphological development of the drops in extensional flows under a series
of different flow conditions. Nearly monodisperse drops were generated using a microfluidic hydrodynamic flowfocusing
device. Once formed, the drops were driven through a contraction which deformed the drops. Two different
types of contractions were employed; a hyperbolic contraction which resulted in a homogeneous extensional flow and a
linear contraction which resulted in a flow whose extension rate increases as the drop passes through the contraction.
The microfluidic results are compared directly to the results of both FiSER and CaBER measurements where direct
observation of the drop morphology cannot be made, but must be inferred by the stress evolution and the predictions of
numerical simulations. We will demonstrate that the combined use of both microfluidics devices and buUc measurement
techniques, like FiSER and CaBER, provides a great deal of insight into the dynamics and morphological evolution of
immiscible polymer blends.
ISBN: 978-0-7354-0549-3
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IC
Appears in Collections:Soft Matter, Rheology and Technology Section
# (joint) last author

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