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Title: Relevance of mild ineffective oesophageal motility (IOM) and potential pharmacological reversibility of severe IOM in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease
Authors: Fornari, F ×
Blondeau, Kathleen
Durand, L
Rey, E
Diaz-Rubio, M
De Meyer, Anna Maria
Tack, Jan
Sifrim, Daniel #
Issue Date: Nov-2007
Series Title: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics vol:26 issue:10 pages:1345-54
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Several studies showed high prevalence of ineffective oesophageal motility (IOM) in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and suggested an important role for ineffective oesophageal motility in increased acid exposure. However, impedance-manometric studies proposed that only severe ineffective oesophageal motility might affect oesophageal clearance. OBJECTIVES: (i) To re-assess the relevance of mild IOM in GERD and (ii) to test the reversibility of IOM. METHODS: Oesophageal motility, clearance and acid exposure were assessed in 191 GERD patients: 99 without IOM; 58 with mild IOM (30-80% ineffective contractions) and 34 with severe IOM (>80% ineffective contractions). In 30 patients with oesophagitis, the potential reversibility of IOM was evaluated with edrophonium intravenously. RESULTS: Patients with mild IOM had identical oesophageal clearance and acid exposure in comparison with those without IOM. Patients with severe IOM had a higher probability of prolonged supine clearance and acid exposure [odds ratio: 2.88 (1.16-7.17); 2.48 (0.99-6.17)]. This effect was independent of the presence of hiatal hernia and male sex. Severe IOM could be transiently reverted in 55% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Mild IOM does not affect oesophageal clearance. Only severe IOM is associated with prolonged clearance and acid exposure, particularly in supine periods. The edrophonium test might be useful to predict severe IOM response to prokinetic medications.
URI: 
ISSN: 0269-2813
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Translational Research in GastroIntestinal Disorders
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

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