ITEM METADATA RECORD
Title: Effects of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria on nodulation of Phaseolus vulgaris L. are dependent on plant P nutrition
Authors: Remans, Roseline ×
Croonenborghs, Anja
Torres Gutierrez, Roldan
Michiels, Jan
Vanderleyden, Jozef #
Issue Date: Nov-2007
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Series Title: European Journal of Plant Pathology vol:119 issue:3 pages:341-351
Abstract: Several plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria
(PGPR) have shown potential to enhance
nodulation of legumes when coinoculated with Rhizobium. To optimize the efficiency of these Rhizobium-PGPR-host plant interactions, unravelling the
underlying mechanisms and analyzing the influence of specific environmental conditions is crucial. In this
work the effect of four PGPR strains on the symbiotic interaction between Rhizobium and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was studied under deficient versus sufficient phosphorus supply. It was observed that the effect on nodulation of three out of four
PGPR tested was strongly dependent on P nutrition.
Further, the use of specific PGPR mutant strains indicated that bacterial indole-3-acetic-acid production (IAA) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity play an important role in
the host nodulation response, particularly under low P conditions. Moreover, it was shown that the differential response to PGPR under low versus high P conditions was associated with changes in the host hormone sensitivity for nodulation induced under P deficiency. These findings contribute to the understanding of the interplay between Rhizobium, PGPR and the plant host under different environmental settings.
ISBN: 978-1-4020-6775-4
ISSN: 0929-1873
Publication status: published
KU Leuven publication type: IT
Appears in Collections:Centre of Microbial and Plant Genetics
× corresponding author
# (joint) last author

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.

Request a copy

 




All items in Lirias are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

© Web of science